Science of Cougars

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Science of Cougars

Today. I’m going to talk about the science of cougars. Now, if you are old enough to remember a Dustin Hoffman being seduced by a sexy and Bancroft in the movie, the graduate, well, you’re probably old enough to be a Cougar yourself these days. I know the terms kind of judgemental. I mean, cougars are predators.

And you know, preying on a young man seems like a terrible thing.

Whatever. It’s happening in our culture a lot. I do not date young men. Very often. So, uh, but let me tell you what science thinks about cougars. First of all, it used to be this idea that women in the Twilight of their life would have dwindling hormones.

That would mean that their sex drive would be lowered. Well, a new study shows that environment. Trump’s hormones. What does that mean? Well, even if you’re in full-blown menopause and your sex hormones are on the decline, if you happen to live in a lively, exciting neighborhood with lots of good looking young men, that trumps, that’s the Google thing.

Another thing, one study showed that women in their late thirties early

forties often get a boost in sex drive in response to their dwindling fertility. So apparently older women love sex. Hmm. Now before you run out and get yourself a young man, I do have one warning though. The wider a woman’s age gap from her husband, the lower her life expectancy.

Apparently, if we marry a much older dude, we really die younger, but if we marry a much younger dude, it’s even worse. This one study showed the best thing for women to do is marry a man right around the same age as you are or don’t marry a man at all. And meet a lot of young men in your lively neighborhood.

I don’t know. I’m not passing judgment. For me, and for many women, sex is an emotional experience that also involves intellectual stimulation. So for plenty of us, the Cougar road is not one we walk on. But for the rest of you, well, enjoy yourself if your neighborhood permits.